Sustainable pace

January 2, 2009

One of the great things about Agile software development that I’ve noticed is sustainable pace. Planning poker, point based estimation and velocity are all great tools for finding a team’s sustainable pace. Knowing a team’s velocity and consistent estimating by the entire team, allows a team to commit to as much work as it is (increasingly) likely to complete, and complete consistently.

As well as properly managed expectations, a sustainable pace has the benefit of ensuring the quality of a team’s work is consistent. When the team is working at such a rate, there is no crunch time, there is no working late. As developers, working beyond our capacity can result in long lasting problems. Beside the whole no life outside of work thing, it also affects the quality of our work. Which always results in cost later in the life-cycle, be it with maintainability or bugs that come out of last minute fixes.

So I sound pretty sold on this whole idea don’t I? Well I am, and I’m almost proud that one of my close friends always leaves the office at ‘hometime’. I taught him both he and his work would be better off than if he stayed behind to finish that last bit! Well this all bit me in the butt recently and it I’ve noticed it has definitely killed off a great part of the job. The Programmers Hi-Five.

So some 6 weeks ago I was handed a project that was ambitious to say the least. I was asked to take our biggest product, which made the most money, and was closely watched for compliance, and rebuild it. No pressure. Being such an important product it naturally followed that it was the most hideous piece of ill maintained code we had. Given said compliance issues we were also not allowed to deliver functionality incrementally, as it was all required to stay compliant. [see curse of the rewrite].

All of this was to be delivered by one of the hardest deadlines we had ever had. As a business there’s an awful lot of buy in in to the whole agile thing, It’s something I’m quite proud of, but this wasn’t very ‘incremental’. So with all of that in mind, I agreed to do the project. As much as I love what we do and how consistently we do it, I work best under unreasonable pressure. I don’t understand any other kind of deadline.

Oh and did I mention it was with a fresh team that hadn’t worked together before? All good fun.

Given a mighty fine team and even some license to rework our QA process we worked ourselves hard. Often staying late, sometimes because we were in the groove (the best kind of working late) and sometimes just to make sure we stayed on course (the worst). We even worked for a few hours on the weekend. Once.

I’m getting mighty long winded, so I’m going to try and summarise the rest:

Good things:

  • Pushing ourselves that hard meant we achieved a lot in a short space of time.
  • We had to work hard to ensure quality throughout, but that has certainly brought new in sight on how we can improve our QA process going forward.
  • The team gelled very quickly. I don’t think we’re done, but I certainly witnessed us passing through forming and storming in an iteration.
  • Programmer Hi Five. A whole lot of satisfaction when something came together. I don’t know why this doesn’t happen more often in the normal course of a project. My hands have never stung so bad.

Bad things:

  • From outside of the team and maybe even from within the team at times, we appeared to not be in control. Almost firefighting. We weren’t (always) but I’m sure as a team we’d prefer to give the impression we knew what we were doing at all times.
  • We don’t have a velocity. We worked too hard to be able to find a velocity, in the upcoming ‘normal’ iterations I have no idea how much work the team is capable of at a Sustainable pace.
  • Left behind. The amount of work we had to do meant often more junior members of the team were left to fend for themselves.
  • Cool down period. We need a cool down period, luckily this all happened at the end of the year. The only time for it if you ask me. Hopefully it won’t be difficult to ramp up after this.

So I think we should throw out sustainable pace once in a while. (I’m thinking once every one or two years). Just to remind ourselves of the fun we had as hackers, and why it’s so much better as developers. The Edge of Chaos is fun.

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